Best time to go?

Although for the most part Namibia’s desert climate makes for good year-round travelling, there are some times of year when rain or heat make particular areas a bit touch-and-go. As is typical of a desert to semi-desert region, hot daytime temperatures in Namibia are often coupled with chilly nights.

The most popular time to visit Namibia in general is from June to November, but April to May with vegetation still lush from the rains is one of the best times to go to Namibia, with warm daytime temperatures of about 25°C and slightly cooler nights. June to September is the driest time of year and the best time for game viewing in the Etosha region. Daytime temperatures average above 20°, but night time temperatures in the desert and on the central plateau can get below freezing.

December is the hottest month in Namibia with temperatures above 40°C and caution must be taken in places such as the Namib Desert and Kaokoveld.  November to February constitutes the rainy season which is hot and humid. During this time rain occurs in the form of spectacular thunderstorms, but the rain generally doesn’t spoil your activities and usually is over in one or two hours.

Often the rain builds through humid days, to great electric storms in the late afternoon which are dramatic and beautiful in the desert.

Will I need an international drivers permit?

Yes. Drivers from outside of the SADC Region will need an international driving permit. This must be obtained in the guest’s resident country before coming to Namibia.

What side of the road do cars drive on and what are the speed limits?

Driving is on the left side of the road and speed limits are 60km/h in towns, 120 km/h on open tarred roads and 100km/h on gravel roads, but we recommend that you don’t drive faster than 80km/h on gravel roads. Most of Namibia’s tourists are involved in single vehicle accidents on gravel roads due to driving too fast.

Is Namibia a malaria risk free area?

Most of Namibia is Malaria free, with the exception the Etosha National Park, the area north of the Park and the Caprivi. The highest risk of Malaria is in the rainy months of November to April and many travellers nowadays opt not to take any precautions when travelling to Etosha in the winter months. This is a personal choice and all guests should consult their doctor or travel clinic about medical precautions.

What is the local currency and what are our payment options?

The unit of currency is the Namibia Dollar (N$), which is divided into 100 cents. This is directly fixed to the South African Rand (ZAR). The Namibia Dollar and the South African Rand are the only legal tender in Namibia.

International Visa and MasterCard’s are generally accepted throughout Namibia, but guests should please advise their banks they are travelling to Southern Africa as some banks as a security precaution, block payments which originate in Southern Africa. Credit cards are not accepted at filling stations and fuel must be paid in cash.

Tipping in Namibia?

It is customary to tip 10% in restaurants of the total bill. Tipping at lodges and hotels for services such as guiding and luggage porters is at own discretion and usually based on the service once received.

What is a car guard?

In most of Namibia’s bigger towns you will find car guards at the parking spaces and shopping malls. These are informal workers, who look after you vehicle and ensure it is safe and secure form petty thieves. They will also assist with finding parking and helping you in and out of tight parking spots, especially if you are not used to driving big 4×4 vehicles. Depending of the time of day and how long you were away, car guards usually receive N$1.00 – N$5.00 for their services.

Please note though, that car guards all have clearly visible uniforms and they will ask you if you want your vehicle checked after.

Drinking Water and can we drink tap water

Almost all tap water is purified and safe to drink. Visitors should exercise caution in rural areas, but the water at the lodges comes straight out of the deep boreholes and you won’t find cleaner water.  Water is as precious as diamonds in this drought-stricken land so please be respectful and make every effort to help conserve Namibia’s water supplies.

Best time to go?

Game viewing is best in the dry season from May to October when the animals congregate around water sources.

Birding, on the other hand, is best between November and March when intra-African and Palaearctic migrants can be seen. If you want to see the bush at its greenest, then December to May is the time to visit. Please note that January and February can be very wet months and are not recommend for travel. Lots of lodges also close down during these months for renovations and general maintenance.

The peak season and most expensive time for travel is from July to October when it is dry, warm to hot and there are relatively few mosquitoes.

Will I need an international drivers permit?

Yes. Drivers from outside of the SADC Region will need an international driving permit. This must be obtained in the guest’s resident country before coming to Botswana.

What side of the road do cars drive on and what are the speed limits?

Driving is on the left side of the road and speed limits are 60km/h in towns, 120 km/h on open tarred roads and 100km/h on gravel roads, but we recommend that you don’t drive faster than 80km/h on gravel roads.

Is Botswana a malaria risk free area?

No! Botswana is a malaria epidemic area and precaution must especially be taken in the summer months, when it is hot and humid. All guests should consult their doctor or travel clinic about medical precautions.

What is the local currency and what are our payment options?

The unit of currency is the Pula (BWP), which is divided into 100 thebe. It is best to also carry small denominations of US Dollar cash with you as well as Pula because U$ are widely accepted and often charged at hotels and lodges.

International Visa and MasterCard’s are generally accepted throughout Botswana, but guests should please advise their banks they are travelling to Southern Africa as some banks as a security precaution, block payments which originate in Southern Africa. Credit cards are not accepted at filling stations and fuel must be paid in cash.

Tipping in Botswana?

It is customary to tip 10% in restaurants of the total bill. Tipping at lodges and hotels for services such as guiding and luggage porters is at own discretion and usually based on the service once received.

Drinking Water and can we drink tap water

Almost all tap water is purified and safe to drink. Visitors should exercise caution in rural areas.

Best time to go?

Zimbabwe is a year round destination, but most guests nowadays base their time of travel on the best time to visit the Victoria Falls. No matter what time of year, the Victoria Falls are always a sight not to be missed. To see the falls at all its glory and at its fullest is after the rainy season from April to May. Although the spray may obscure your view slightly, the overall experience is breathtaking, but we do recommend that you hire an umbrella or take along a rain jacket as it can become quite a wet experience. At the end of the dry season from October to December, the water levels are quite low and you can sit in a rock pool and cautiously peer over the edge! The great thing about Victoria Falls is that the side of the falls always carry water.

Will I need an international drivers permit?

Yes. Drivers from outside of the SADC Region will need an international driving permit. This must be obtained in the guest’s resident country before coming to Zimbabwe.

What side of the road do cars drive on and what are the speed limits?

Driving is on the left side of the road and speed limits are 60km/h in towns, 120 km/h on open tarred roads and 100km/h on gravel roads, but we recommend that you don’t drive faster than 80km/h on gravel roads.

Is Zimbabwe a malaria risk free area?

No! Most of Zimbabwe is a malaria epidemic area and precaution must especially be taken in the summer months, when it is hot and humid. All guests should consult their doctor or travel clinic about medical precautions.

What is the local currency and what are our payment options?

The Zimbabwean unit of currency is the Zimbabwean dollar (Z$), which is divided into 100 cents. The inflation rate in Zimbabwe has more or less made the Zimbabwe Dollar worthless and it is recommend that only U$ Dollars in 20 and 50 Dollar notes are taken to Zimbabwe. Credits cards are sadly not accepted in Zimbabwe anymore and all needs to be paid in cash.

Tipping in Zimbabwe?

It is customary to tip 10% in restaurants of the total bill. Tipping at lodges and hotels for services such as guiding and luggage porters is at own discretion and usually based on the service once received.

Drinking Water and can we drink tap water

Most, if not all locals, drink happily from municipal supplies. However, if you suspect you may have a sensitive stomach, then bottled water is recommended and is readily available.